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public:t-vien-11-1:lab4 [2011/05/11 10:38]
hannes
public:t-vien-11-1:lab4 [2011/05/11 10:40] (current)
hannes
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   - **A Physics Based Version**:\\ In the version of the factory above, you were faking movement in a physical world by using interpolators to move objects around.  You had to do everything by hand, and even so, not everything is looking right.  For example, if the box hits the edge of the door, the box stops, even if physics tell us that the box should just tip over and fall off the edge.  In fact, if it lands on the door, it doesn't even move with the door.  All of these details can be taken care of with a good simulation of physics and rigid body dynamics.  One such engine is the [[http://www.ode.org/|Open Dynamics Engine (ODE)]] and another such engine is [[http://developer.nvidia.com/object/physx.html|NVidia PhysX]].  Both of these engines are supported by Panda3D. ODE is an open source project, and therefore the whole source (which is in C++) is available for those that are interested. PhysX is a commercial product, and is somewhat more robust and precise (used in a number of high-end games), but you only get access to run-time binaries in addition to the API. In this part of the lab, you can choose to create the above scene with ODE or PhysX (or both if you wish). Simply follow the instructions for each below:   - **A Physics Based Version**:\\ In the version of the factory above, you were faking movement in a physical world by using interpolators to move objects around.  You had to do everything by hand, and even so, not everything is looking right.  For example, if the box hits the edge of the door, the box stops, even if physics tell us that the box should just tip over and fall off the edge.  In fact, if it lands on the door, it doesn't even move with the door.  All of these details can be taken care of with a good simulation of physics and rigid body dynamics.  One such engine is the [[http://www.ode.org/|Open Dynamics Engine (ODE)]] and another such engine is [[http://developer.nvidia.com/object/physx.html|NVidia PhysX]].  Both of these engines are supported by Panda3D. ODE is an open source project, and therefore the whole source (which is in C++) is available for those that are interested. PhysX is a commercial product, and is somewhat more robust and precise (used in a number of high-end games), but you only get access to run-time binaries in addition to the API. In this part of the lab, you can choose to create the above scene with ODE or PhysX (or both if you wish). Simply follow the instructions for each below:
     - [[public:t-vien-10-3:lab_4_materials:ode|Open Dynamics Engine (ODE) Instructions]]     - [[public:t-vien-10-3:lab_4_materials:ode|Open Dynamics Engine (ODE) Instructions]]
-====== Lab 4 Events, Collision and Movement ======+    [[public:t-vien-10-3:lab_4_materials:physx|NVidia PhysX Instructions (unfairly only for Windows)]]
  
-==== Before You Start ==== 
- 
-  * Download and unzip the [[http://www.ru.is/kennarar/hannes/classes/ve2010/Lab4Assets.zip|Lab 4 Asset File]] into your working directory 
-  * (Optional) For working with PhysX (see last step below), you need to install [[http://www.ru.is/kennarar/hannes/share/PhysX_9.10.0513_SystemSoftware.exe|The PhysX Software System]] 
  
  
/var/www/ailab/WWW/wiki/data/pages/public/t-vien-11-1/lab4.txt ยท Last modified: 2011/05/11 10:40 by hannes