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public:t-720-atai:atai-16:lecture_notes_f-16_04.03.2016 [2017/12/06 13:37]
thorisson [What is Reasoning ?]
public:t-720-atai:atai-16:lecture_notes_f-16_04.03.2016 [2017/12/06 13:38] (current)
thorisson [What is Reasoning ?]
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 |  Reasoning is an ability of the (human) mind  | We can also say that reasoning is, first and foremost, a cognitive ability - an ability of minds to draw inferences (generate absent information).   | |  Reasoning is an ability of the (human) mind  | We can also say that reasoning is, first and foremost, a cognitive ability - an ability of minds to draw inferences (generate absent information).   |
 |  Traditional theories of reasoning  | - The only inference rule is deduction. \\ - The meaning of a compound term is completely determined by the meaning of its components and the operator that joins the components. \\ - A statement is either true or false. \\ - The truth value of a statement does not change over time. \\ - A contradiction leads to the “proof” of any arbitrary conclusion. \\ - Inference processes follow algorithms, which makes them deterministically predictable, and any conclusion can be accurately reproduced. \\ - Every inference process has a prespecified goal, and the process stops whenever its goal is achieved. \\ Source: [[http://cis-linux1.temple.edu/~pwang/Publication/cognitive_mathematical.pdf|Cognitive Logic versus Mathematical Logic]] by P. Wang   | |  Traditional theories of reasoning  | - The only inference rule is deduction. \\ - The meaning of a compound term is completely determined by the meaning of its components and the operator that joins the components. \\ - A statement is either true or false. \\ - The truth value of a statement does not change over time. \\ - A contradiction leads to the “proof” of any arbitrary conclusion. \\ - Inference processes follow algorithms, which makes them deterministically predictable, and any conclusion can be accurately reproduced. \\ - Every inference process has a prespecified goal, and the process stops whenever its goal is achieved. \\ Source: [[http://cis-linux1.temple.edu/~pwang/Publication/cognitive_mathematical.pdf|Cognitive Logic versus Mathematical Logic]] by P. Wang   |
-|  Arguments against the mathematical approach  | Pei Wang has convincingly argued that //**non-axiomatic reasoning**//, i.e. reasoning where no a-priori universals can be provided, is the only kind relevant to an AGI, and that such reasoning follows different rules than axiomatic reasoning. \\ Incidentally, he is the only AI researcher (I am aware of, besides myself) that argues this point -- everyone else is going with some well-known form of reasoning as a model for AI and human reasoning.   |+|  Arguments against the traditional mathematical approach  | Pei Wang has convincingly argued that //**non-axiomatic reasoning**//, i.e. reasoning where no a-priori universals can be provided, is the only kind relevant to an AGI, and that such reasoning follows different rules than axiomatic reasoning. \\ Incidentally, he is the only AI researcher (I am aware of, besides myself) that argues this point -- everyone else is going with some well-known form of reasoning as a model for AI and human reasoning.   |
  
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/var/www/ailab/WWW/wiki/data/pages/public/t-720-atai/atai-16/lecture_notes_f-16_04.03.2016.txt · Last modified: 2017/12/06 13:38 by thorisson