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public:rem4:rem4-20:philosophy_of_science_i [2020/01/13 11:39]
thorisson
public:rem4:rem4-20:philosophy_of_science_i [2020/01/13 11:51] (current)
thorisson [Concepts]
Line 16: Line 16:
 |  Hypothesis \\ (ísl. tilgáta)  | A prediction about the relationship between a limited set of phenomena, as explained by a particular theory. \\ Any statement about the world that must hold true if a given scientific theory is correct.  | |  Hypothesis \\ (ísl. tilgáta)  | A prediction about the relationship between a limited set of phenomena, as explained by a particular theory. \\ Any statement about the world that must hold true if a given scientific theory is correct.  |
 |  Data \\ (ísl. gögn)  | Typically "raw numbers" -- only contain low-level semantics.  | |  Data \\ (ísl. gögn)  | Typically "raw numbers" -- only contain low-level semantics.  |
-|  Information (ísl. upplýsingar)  | Processed and prepared data -- "data with a purpose".  |+|  Information \\ (ísl. upplýsingar)  | Processed and prepared data -- "data with a purpose".  |
 |  Randomness  | It is hypothesized in quantum physics that the universe may possibly be built on a truly random foundation, which means that some things are by their very nature unpredictable. Randomness in the aggregate, however, does seem to follow some predictable laws (c.f. the concept of "laws of probability"). | |  Randomness  | It is hypothesized in quantum physics that the universe may possibly be built on a truly random foundation, which means that some things are by their very nature unpredictable. Randomness in the aggregate, however, does seem to follow some predictable laws (c.f. the concept of "laws of probability"). |
 |  Sampling  | Sampling theory uses statistics to tell us \\ (a) how many random measurements we need to make to make a prediction about a whole group of which they are members and \\ (b) how reliable the results are given the particular methods of sampling and recorded variations in the data. \\ (Notice: not the same as Nyquist's sampling theorem, which states that to capture a waveform accuractly in digital form you need to sample it at more than twice its frequency.) | |  Sampling  | Sampling theory uses statistics to tell us \\ (a) how many random measurements we need to make to make a prediction about a whole group of which they are members and \\ (b) how reliable the results are given the particular methods of sampling and recorded variations in the data. \\ (Notice: not the same as Nyquist's sampling theorem, which states that to capture a waveform accuractly in digital form you need to sample it at more than twice its frequency.) |
/var/www/ailab/WWW/wiki/data/pages/public/rem4/rem4-20/philosophy_of_science_i.txt · Last modified: 2020/01/13 11:51 by thorisson